Taking The Plane

Taking The Plane

You have carefully chosen where you want to go, but what about how you’re going to get there?

How long is the flight? What time will you leave? How long in transit once you’ve landed? Are you planning a calm, relaxing holiday or an exciting, often tiring road trip? Is your destination well adapted to your physical condition and your daily habits?

Before you leave, it’s important to discuss these questions and the consequences of making a long flight, with your doctor. It is particularly essential if:

  • You have a cold, sinus trouble or an ear ache or ear infection
  • You suffer from a chronic illness, notably: insulin-dependent diabetes, asthma, allergies, epilepsy, drepanocytosis, respiratory insufficiency, heart or kidney failure
  • You are receiving treatment for cancer or an immune deficiency
  • You have panic attacks (agoraphobia or claustrophobia)
  • You recently had an operation, particularly in the case of coronary insufficiency (angioplasty or bypass surgery), glaucoma, detachment of the retina, or a problem with the inner ear
  • You suffer from renal colic
  • You’re experiencing angina pain
  • You’re taking long-term medication
  • You cannot climb stairs without getting out of breath
  • You’ve recently had a vascular brain accident
  • Your doctor discovered that you have rhythmic or cardiac conduction trouble, which may cause fainting
  • You wear a pacemaker
  • You are pregnant or you plan on travelling with children.